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Quarantine
1B, Basil Chambers
65 High Street
Manchester
England
M4 1FS

Quarantine was established in 1998 by directors Richard Gregory and Renny O’Shea with designer Simon Banham. We make original theatre, performance and public events with and about the people who are in it. Whatever form it takes, our work begins and ends with the people in the room. Over the last 20 years, we've collaborated with a shifting constellation of artists, performers and people who've never done anything like this before. Our work seeks to create the circumstances for a conversation between strangers...

English

English

Somewhere between a linguistic puzzle and a collaborative stream of consciousness, a discourse on identity and a piece of ragtag, freeform improvisation
Andrew Dickson, The Guardian, June 2018

When the show finished, the conversations flowed between strangers
★★★★ Owen Richards, theartsdesk.com, June 2018 

It is Jonny’s open nature and vulnerability that makes English such an intimate and thought-provoking experience
Taylor Edmonds, Wales Arts Review, June 2018

Blurs the boundaries between creator/receiver and audience/performer
★★★★ Luke Seidel-Haas, Get the Chance, June 2018

Summer. Autumn. Winter. Spring.

Summer. Autumn. Winter. Spring.

Quarantine has created something genuinely special with this show. Summer. Autumn. Winter. Spring. is a high watermark in the history of a remarkable theatre company… Steve Timms, The Skinny, March 2016

Quietly, determinedly brilliant… a vital reminder that we’re not all so very different, or so very separate after all… Andrew Haydon, The Stage, 2016 

Wallflower

Wallflower

Enchanting ‘slow theatre’… Theaterkrant, August 2015 [translated from Dutch]

Lo-fi, freewheeling and rather brilliant… lust, death, heartbreak and petty shoplifting, all the big and small stuff is here, reminding us that memories are lived experiences, not just mental Polaroids. ★★★★ London Evening Standard, 21 October 2016

I remember the spotlight, Al Green, Daft Punk. A handstand while doing the splits. A Gladys Knight song, a ripple of mic cable, a round of applause that we all really meant. A front room and a back room, traversed in private. I remember disco lights with no discernible rhythm. I remember shoes off, green socks. I remember coming home and feeling flushed again, flushed like my moment of realisation in Entitled, flushed and energised and writing this. Megan Vaughan, October 2016

 

An exhilarating and inventive exploration of physical memory The Upcoming, October 2016

Summer.

Summer.

The whole thing exudes warmth, and a valuably impolite yet delicate and searching curiosity about what it is that makes us human. Tonight and tomorrow the show will be different. Because that’s how life is. The Guardian, June 2014

…Life, like this show, is precious and changeable, and happens in the moments amongst the madness. Tomorrow will reveal something else, or offer up another gift, or take another surprising turn. Public Reviews, June 2014

Entitled

Entitled

It hums with quiet honesty, unflashy reveals, tender regrets and risk-taking. The Guardian, July 2011

A thoroughly enjoyable education in ‘real theatre’ achieved through infinite complexity, raw performances and quiet reflection. Whatsonstage, July 2011

Hugely audacious. The Stage, July 2011

What Richard Gregory and his company do is show that mankind is constantly reaching for something beyond its power. NRC Handelsblad, Netherlands daily, August 2011

 …There’s something special going on here as Quarantine tries to reach into areas of the theatrical experience others companies ignore. The Times, September 2011

Through their marvellous, unforced performances, Richard Gregory’s production orchestrates pockets of tenderness and quit regret. As it closes, Entitled defies expectations and doesn’t disappoint. David Jays, Dancing Times, September 2011

 

Susan & Darren

Susan & Darren

Grounded in tenderness and humour, their show may be rough around the edges but has an exceptionally warm centre. Go out of your way to see it.
Donald Hutera, The Times May 2010

In this brief 90 minutes they allow us to take part in their lives and you come away feeling like you have known them forever…with a buffet and disco thrown in, this really is a little gem of a show.  Craig Hepworth, What’s On Stage 05 May 2010

At times their closeness is almost unbearable. “What will you miss about me when I’m gone? Susan asks. Most of all, dancing with you, ” says Darren
Luke Jennings, The Observer, May 2010 

Susan & Darren feels wonderfully fresh and unscripted: they just talk to us, even when they’re acknowledging how theatrical this is.
Zoe Anderson, The Independent May 2010

The show is full of lovely and surprising moments, an incredible tenderness is displayed between the pair and of course the key to its success is what it tells us of our own relationships. Marissa Burgess, Manchester Evening News 2010

What happens when a son asks his mum to come and dance on tour with him? Lyndsey Winship discovers that the family that dances together stays together. Time Out, 12 May 2010

Words cannot do this living, breathing work justice. Go and experience it for yourself – it may change your life.  Charlotte Kasner, ballet.co.uk May 2010

A beautiful, thought provoking piece of work. Joan DaviesManchester Confidential, May 6 2010

The most heartwarming, vein-thrumming, uplifting show of this Festival. Fiona McCann, Irish Times.com 2008

It’s intimate, life-affirming, utterly magical and unmissable.
*****Noeleen Dowling, Irish Times 17 Nov 08

There’s a moment when Susan looks at Darren and your heart squeezes at the raw honesty of it.
**** Mary Brennan, The Herald 19 Oct 2007

It is not often, at the end of a show, that you long to rush up and hug the performers, but I had to resist the urge after this piece produced by Company Fierce and Quarantine.
Lyn Gardner, Guardian review 13 Nov 2006

…we’ve never seen one of these fragile, beautiful performances that wasn’t an outright winner. 
Guardian Guide preview 6 May 2006

Quarantine’s latest piece, Susan & Darren, makes for cosy reading in this year’s queerupnorth brochure (‘dancing, conversation and a lovely buffet’), but don’t be fooled…Metro preview 9 May 2006

 

 

The Soldier's Song

The Soldier's Song

Fun and silly, poignant and breathtakingly unique…the political became intensely and unforgettably personal. Real Time Arts Magazine 2011

However remote our connection is with our service personnel, this imaginative installation is powerful yet often humorous…Lynne Walker, The Independent, 08 June 2010

This piece is typical of Quarantine’s potent intermixing of theatre and real world contingency. Yes, the idea might be simple, but it also nudges aside ideas about the temperament of soldiers.
Robert Clarke, The Guardian 2010

One of the first people to show off their vocal skills was Danny Doyle who served for 20 years in the armed forces including the Irish Guards. The 80-year-old from Baxenden said: “It’s a good idea and it’s good fun to do.” Accrington Observer, 26 April 2013

 

Old people, children and animals

Old people, children and animals

“What to see this week”, Guardian blog 9 June 2008

Guardian Guide preview 6 June 2008

Guardian feature by Lyn Gardner 10 June 2008

Guardian review by Alfred Hickling 16 June 2008
“What will you do with my story?” one of the performers asks a man in the front row. “Treasure it,” comes the reply.

Metro interview with Richard 17 June 2008

The Scotsman review by Joyce McMillan 21 June 2008
“This is, in other words, one of those memorable shows that stop us in our rush through the days,”

The Independent review by Lynne Walker 19 June 2008
“…it’s strangely compelling, especially the set of teenage twins and their ace drummer accomplice.”

Grace

Grace

The great thing about the theatre group Quarantine is that you never know who you are going to be presented with on stage.
Alfred Hickling, The Guardian 18 Oct 2005

So, what is it about? I’ve never discussed a piece of theatre more than Grace and I’m still not certain.
Emma Hardy, BBC Online 13 Oct 2005

If there was an award for most arresting poster of the year, Grace – the latest from Manchester-based Quarantine – would be a shoo-in. It’s not every day of the week you see a Lidl shopping bag floating in balletic fashion along an empty beach.
Steve Timms, City Life preview 6 Oct 2005

Butterfly

Butterfly

Quarantine’s new show – in which family members play themselves on stage – has been called reality theatre. But it’s much better than that, says Lyn Gardner. Guardian preview 11 October 2004

A family party can be as good as a piece of theatre, so this is an intriguing experiment: can a family party be turned into a piece of theatre? 
Susan Mansfield, The Scotsman 11 October 2004

When it comes to keeping it real, Quarantine Theatre Company is in a league of its own.
Alan Chadwick, Metro 6 October 2004

The buffet’s laid out and waiting for the guests – that’s us, by the way.
**** Mary Brennan, Herald 8 October 2004

They say you can’t choose your family. But director Richard Gregory did. 
Corrie Mills, The List 23 September 2004

(Butterfly) has the avant garde’s combination of fun and seriousness of purpose.
**** Sunday Herald 17 October 2004

It is like drawing back a curtain on other people’s lives…
The Guardian 2 October 2004

Rantsoen

Rantsoen

O’Shea is the creator and director of a show called EatEat, which was originally devised with refugees and asylum seekers in Leicester and is now being re-created under a new name, Rantsoen, with immigrants in Gent in Belgium.
Article in The Guardian on food and theatre 7 June 2004

 Audiences rush to digest a spate of plays starring food.
Article by Sarah Sennott,Newsweek 5 July 2004

White Trash

White Trash

The term “white trash” is derogatory. But there is nothing at all derogatory about this latest piece from Quarantine, a company that specialises in weaving fictions from the real stuff and stories of people’s everyday lives. 
Lyn Gardner, Guardian 13 March 2004

Crucially, the performers in Quarantine’s new, provocatively-titled show White Trash are not actors in the common sense of the word…
Manchester Evening News Preview 12 March 2004

 The latest show from experimental Manchester company Quarantine is billed as a ‘dirty ballet of reality’.”
City Life preview 10 March 2004

Geneva

Geneva

…Arnfield’s emotional ascent and plummet is, in turns, mesmerising and distressing…
Sam Summers Metro 13 Jan 2004

A play about climbing mountains might seem strange to some, but to actor and explorer Jane Arnfield, Geneva is a unique chance to share her life-long passion for adventure and exploration of the unknown.
Andrew Fenwick, Evening Chronicle 9 Jan 2004

It’s a long way from Julie Andrews’ Climb Every Mountain.
The Crack preview Jan 04

EatEat

EatEat

O’Shea is the creator and director of a show called EatEat, which was originally devised with refugees and asylum seekers in Leicester and is now being re-created under a new name, Rantsoen, with immigrants in Gent in Belgium.
Article in The Guardian on food and theatre 7 June 2004

Frank

Frank

This journey is what you make of it.
**** Elizabeth Scott, Metro North East 5 June 2002

It is a step into the unknown followed by a journey to be made alone. Scareee! I sent the wife.
David Whetstone, The Journal 1 June 2002 

As Shakespeare said, “All the world’s a stage”. After experiencing Frank, you’ll believe it.
Angela Dodson, Sheilds Gazette 4 June 2002

A journey into the unknown through a series of rooms. No stage, apparently no script.
Viv Hardwick, Northern Echo 1 June 2002

Something a taxi driver in Liverpool said...

Something a taxi driver in Liverpool said...

I don’t often carry the memory of a theatrical event in my feet…
Colin Thomas, Straight Times (Vancouver) 13 October 2005

You might find this nightmarish, intrusive, theatening and disturbing, or playful and fun. I found it calming, surreal and quite beautiful.
Robin Greer, News Letter 30 October 2002

From the moment you enter the auditorium to the time you step back into the outside world, Renny O’Shea’s magical journey will take you far away from the madding crowd.
Grania McFadden, Belfast Telegraph 29 October 2002

How can darkness shed light on the simple things of this life?
Charlene Dunlop, Irish News 5 November 2002

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