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Quarantine
PO Box 573
Manchester
England
M32 2BZ

Quarantine was established in 1998 by directors Richard Gregory and Renny O’Shea with designer Simon Banham. We make original theatre, performance and public events with and about the people who are in it. Whatever form it takes, our work begins and ends with the people in the room. Over the last 20 years, we've collaborated with a shifting constellation of artists, performers and people who've never done anything like this before. Our work seeks to create the circumstances for a conversation between strangers...

Summer. Autumn. Winter. Spring. Staging Life and Death

Summer. Autumn. Winter. Spring. Staging Life and Death

Between 2014 and 2016, Quarantine produced the first iteration of Summer. Autumn. Winter. Spring., an epic quartet comprising three live performances and one film. The full quartet premiered at the Old Granada Television Studios in Manchester in March/April 2016.

This illustrated volume is both a case study of the work, and an investigation into the various themes surrounding it. At the heart of the work is the human life cycle and our relationship with time: the processes of living and dying, the experience of looking backwards and forwards, of being in the present, and of reflection on the stages of life. This volume collects together a range of artists, producers and thinkers who have significant things to say about these important themes.

Edited by: Simon Banham, Sarah Hunter, Michael Brady and Renny O’Shea
Published by: Manchester University Press (October 2019)
ISBN: 978-1-5261-4347-1


Order: Summer. Autumn. Winter. Spring. Staging Life and Death




To order for postage outside of Europe, please email info@qtine.com

Neighbourly encounters in the rapidly changing city

Neighbourly encounters in the rapidly changing city

This report by Dr Ben Dunn & Dr Abigail Gilmore from the University of Manchester considers the performance and practices of being ‘neighbourly’. It summarises research for Meet the Neighbours, a three-year (2017-20) project led by Quarantine and co-funded by the European Union’s Creative Europe programme that invited artists into neighbourhoods in cities undergoing rapid change. Reflecting on the project’s artist residencies and the urban contexts in which they took place, it investigates how the presence of artists can shape and create public space.

Neighbourly encounters in the rapidly changing city: Researching Meet the Neighbours

The Twenty-First Century Performance Reader

The Twenty-First Century Performance Reader

The Twenty-First Century Performance Reader combines extracts from over 70 international practitioners, companies, collectives and makers from the fields of Dance, Theatre, Music, Live and Performance Art, and Activism to form an essential sourcebook for students, researchers and practitioners.

Contribution from Quarantine: A SHOW OF HANDS

The Twenty-First Century Performance Reader
Published July, 2019 by Routledge

On the politics and practicalities of developing new audiences for contemporary performance

On the politics and practicalities of developing new audiences for contemporary performance

This report includes reflections from Quarantine and our partners from our 2017 UK tour of Wallflower, around our ambition to use the themes of the work to meet people who dance for pleasure but may not currently engage with dance or theatre as artforms.

Read the report: On the politics and practicalities of developing new audiences for contemporary performance

No More Drama

No More Drama

“Something different is happening in contemporary theatre. Across the world the artform is changing; sometimes radically, sometimes discreetly, but quite perceptibly. When actors do not present us with characters, when the boundaries of the theatre space loosen and spill performance into the world around us, when the play is certainly no longer the thing, how do we talk about our theatre?”

No More Drama, a new book about contemporary performance published by Project Press, aims to take the chill off the terms postdramatic, documentary and avant-garde. A collection of descriptive and illuminating essays on the work of international artists such as Pan Pan Theatre Company, Rimini Protokoll, Lola Arias, Philippe Quesne, Richard Maxwell, Elevator Repair Service, Nature Theater Oklahoma, Quarantine, Krétakör and others, it is about how theatre is making meaning of the world – without making a drama about it.

No More Drama is edited by Peter Crawley and Willie White.

 

Intimacy across visceral and digital performance

Intimacy across visceral and digital performance

On Appearance: Performance Research 13.4

On Appearance: Performance Research 13.4

On Civility: Performance Research 9.4

On Civility: Performance Research 9.4

Transit

Transit

Photographer Ali Taptik visited five ‘cities on the edge’: Liverpool, Marseille, Gdansk, Naples and his home city of Istanbul for Coming and going.  His remarkable images – a meditation on travel, loneliness and love, were distributed around Liverpool in the form of fold-out ‘maps’.   

Contact us to buy a map (cost £5 each)

Notebook